AFH Timeline

2012
A New Vision for The Andrew Freedman Home – A Complex of Initiatives
The Andrew Freedman is expanding into a new and exciting destination for art, culture, learning and creativity. There is a revitalizing vision for the opulent space, where multiple initiatives are being launched to further engage the community and cement Mid-Bronx Senior Citizens Council’s role as a relevant social force.

“We are committed to creating a fresh vision for the Andrew Freedman as a destination for artistic and cultural exchange, a hub of learning and creativity that engages our community by bringing exciting, interactive programs to the people of the Bronx,” says Jeanette Puryear, President & CEO of MBSCC. “Our aim is to maintain an open and welcoming space for all community residents. We will continue to provide much needed social services, while incorporating innovative, artistic programming into our event schedule. Local artists can work along side established artists. Young people can learn about media arts and ‘going green’; adults can become well trained in a variety of high growth industries, learn how to develop small businesses and continue their education,” Puryear adds.

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1995
Family Preservation Center Created
In 1995 MBSCC created the Family Preservation Center, located on the lower level of the Andrew Freedman. The Center, born out of an initiative of former New York Governor, Mario Cuomo, is a “safety net” of community services and referrals.

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1992
The Andrew Freedman Home Receives Landmark Status
On June 2, 1992, the majestic architectural structure of The Andrew Freedman Home received landmark status by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. It is now amongst less than 100 individual landmarks in the borough of the Bronx. The building has been continuously maintained since its construction in the early 1920s.

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1984
Mid-Bronx Acquires The Andrew Freedman Home
From 1985-2007, MBSCC sponsored and managed an Adult Residential Facility at the Andrew Freedman. At its peak, 130 seniors lived here until escalating costs forced the Home to close, but the Andrew Freedman continued to be used for other community focused projects.

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1924-1983
Long History as a Luxurious Home for the Elderly
The Renaissance Palazzo styled Andrew Freedman functioned as a beautiful respite for the elderly for 59 years where couples and seniors lived out their twilight years in delightful charm and elegance. Delicious meals served in the grand ballroom, card games in the drawing room, afternoon tea in the garden, reclining with a classic novel in the Freedman’s exquisite library, these were all semblance of the luxe life of the building’s residents during its heyday.